In the Department of Agricultural Education and Communications at Texas Tech University, the students are many. Some have followed in their parents’ and even their grandparents’ footsteps to take their knowledge of the agricultural industry to the next level. Mary Lou Flom has been a vital part of the intellectual growth of these young minds for 40 years, working behind the scenes in the department as the administrative business assistant.

Freshmen attending orientation at Texas Tech University are separated according to college for advising. Students from various colleges walk into the advising office to learn what classes they need to register for before they are sent out on their own to complete the task of registration. Most students meet with someone who works in an office year-round. There is one college on campus, however, that does things a little differently than others.

Every great work of art is the product of a unique process. The famous Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci is made up of at least 30 separate layers of paint, 86 changes were made to Thomas Jefferson’s initial draft of the Declaration of Independence before finalizing it, and Lubbock’s finest bronze sculpture artist, Garland Weeks, uses an eight-step process for each of his masterpieces. Weeks’ masterpieces consist of more than just his sculptures, but also his lifelong legacy.

James Wedel’s alarm goes off at 5 A.M. Grabbing a cup of coffee and a newspaper he gets ready to begin his day. However, instead of donning his traditional jeans and work boots, today he will put on his suit and tie to trek the halls of the U.S. Congress in Washington D.C. on behalf of Texas agriculture. Over the next four days, he will face a grueling schedule of back-to-back meetings for 10 to 12 straight hours. Wedel will walk countless miles on the Hill before his job is done, but when it is over his testimony will help shape American agricultural policy for future generations.