The agricultural communications program at Texas Tech University introduced a new high-impact learning experience called the “ACOM Block” in 2017. The Block is a series of four courses designed to mimic a comprehensive, real-world workplace experience for students before they graduate from the program. 

Texas attorney Garrett Couts grew up in a household that bled scarlet and black for Texas Tech University. It was in Pampa, Texas, where he was surrounded by agriculture, showing and breeding swine. He was a book worm with strong interest in politics and wanting to go to Washington, D.C., and had two teachers in high school who pushed him to attend law school.

In 2020, following Covid-19, Scott Burris, Ph.D., chair for the Department of Agricultural Education and Communications, and his team implemented three value statements that would go on to shape the department into what it is now. The values served as a road map for navigating the unusual and trying time that they would soon face. Go Beyond, Invest in Others, and Create a Collaborative Culture are demonstrated daily amongst the students and faculty.

The culture built through producers working to meet the specifications of the brand to provide consumers with performing product is the cornerstone of CAB. All parts work together through every single stage of the cycle to ensure that what is being created internally is being presented externally.

“I mean, it’s those kinds of things that are the cool moments, the cool memories,” Doerfert said. “It’s not the awards. It’s those moments when I see someone successful because maybe I had a little bit to do with it. That’s my reward. That’s the thing that make me happy.” – David Doerfert

“Everything I’ve [previously] done is all connected now because I’m working with all my friends and contacts I made while in Lubbock, Austin and Washington, D.C.,” Adams said. “Texas Farm Bureau has allowed me to gain countless new contacts which in-turn help enact good ag policy in D.C. I love working directly for farmers and ranchers and Texas Farm Bureau; you can’t find a better place to work if you’re going to serve the ag community.”