In 2020, following Covid-19, Scott Burris, Ph.D., chair for the Department of Agricultural Education and Communications, and his team implemented three value statements that would go on to shape the department into what it is now. The values served as a road map for navigating the unusual and trying time that they would soon face. Go Beyond, Invest in Others, and Create a Collaborative Culture are demonstrated daily amongst the students and faculty.

More Than a Show

Dedication is the word that commonly describes the Texas Tech Ranch Horse Team.

Brashears is excited to bring her experiences she gained in Washington D.C., back to her career at Texas Tech and incorporate those skills into her everyday roles as a faculty member. From teaching students, to leading several research projects, she will now be able to add a new dimension to the work that she is currently doing.

“I mean, it’s those kinds of things that are the cool moments, the cool memories,” Doerfert said. “It’s not the awards. It’s those moments when I see someone successful because maybe I had a little bit to do with it. That’s my reward. That’s the thing that make me happy.” – David Doerfert

A recent high school graduate from a rural West Texas town stepped onto the Texas Tech University campus in fall of 2000 – the turn of a new century. She knew three things: she loved agriculture, she enjoyed politics, and she had absolutely no idea what she wanted to be when she “grew up.” Yet, there she stood, meeting with her academic adviser, “all grown up.”

From a young age, Kristina Butts was involved in the agriculture and cattle industries. Because of that background, Kristina thought she would find a job within production agriculture after she graduated. Like many students, however—because of an opportunity to intern in Washington, D.C.—those plans changed. That opportunity blossomed into years of work in D.C., but more importantly, that opportunity grew into a habit of mentoring.

Walking through the doors of the freshly cleaned animal shelter, Allison Andrukonis’ ears filled with barking dogs. Passing dogs row by row, she selected the one lucky dog of the day. Today, a trip to the ice cream shop was on the menu for this special pup.

“The saying that it takes a village to raise a kid was really true for me,” Ainsley said. “There were multiple people in my life who influenced me and helped raise me, and when I started walking around the agriculture department that is exactly what I felt, the village.”

The spring of 2018 proved to be another tumultuous season with the constant risk of a disastrous wildfires burning ominously bright. Much of Tech’s next generation of land conservationists will go through Verble’s class. As students within Texas Tech University’s Department of Natural Resource Management they will employ countless practices, including prescribed burning, to be dedicated stewards of the land.

Texas Tech University, South Plains College and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department cooperatively worked together to develop the Bachelor of Science in Conservation Law Enforcement, a one-of-a-kind exclusive degree program that can only be obtained from Texas Tech.